McCoy Tyner – McCoy Tyner with Stanley Clarke and Al Foster (2000) PS3 ISO

McCoy Tyner – McCoy Tyner with Stanley Clarke and Al Foster (2000)
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | Time – 01:05:36 minutes | 2,65 GB | Genre: Jazz
©  Telarc | Recorded: (DSD recording) Clinton Recording Studio “B”, New York City, April 27-28, 1999

One of the musical highlights of the new millennium is already here: McCoy Tyner with Stanley Clarke and Al Foster, the follow-up to the legendary pianist’s critically-acclaimed Telarc debut, McCoy Tyner and the Latin All-Stars. On this new release, McCoy Tyner explores the art of the trio, with a dynamic set of 11 tracks that features new tunes from Tyner and Clarke.
McCoy Tyner with Stanley Clarke and Al Foster is a clear indication that Tyner’s interests lie firmly in the future, and in his own compositions. In addition to two takes of “I Want to Tell You ‘Bout That” (the first with Clarke on electric bass, the next on acoustic), other Tyner compositions include “Trane-like,” “Once Upon A Time,” “Goin’ ‘Way Blues,” “Carriba” and “Memories.” Tyner’s unique and blazing interpretations of standards are apparent in his renditions of “Never Let Me Go” and “Will You Still Be Mine.” Another highlight is Clarke’s own “In the Tradition Of.”
McCoy Tyner is assured of a major position in any jazz history of the 20th century—a versatile composer, arranger and leader whose distinctive sound looms over entire generations. He was born in Philadelphia in 1938 when Bud Powell, Benny Golson (and of course, John Coltrane) and many others were in the neighborhood. And Tyner is the only jazz giant to have honed his craft in, of all places, his mother’s beauty parlor in West Philadelphia—jamming among the hair dryers and curling irons.
Stanley Clarke (born in 1951) is also from Philly, and on this project he plays mostly acoustic bass. Well known for his work with Return to Forever and as a trailblazing solo artist, Clarke continues to revolutionize his instrument. A first-generation fusion player who is constantly shifting directions, this project offers a rare opportunity to hear his more straight-ahead playing.
McCoy Tyner with Stanley Clarke and Al Foster is a brilliant second installment of Tyner’s work on Telarc. Both discs make it clear that the undeniable talents of McCoy Tyner continue growing greater with time.

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McCoy Tyner – Live at Fabrik Hamburg 1986 (Live) (2022) [Official Digital Download 24bit/48kHz]

McCoy Tyner – Live at Fabrik Hamburg 1986 (Live) (2022)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/48 kHz | Time – 02:07:07 minutes | 1,49 GB | Genre: Jazz
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download | Front Cover | © Jazzline

The start of the new Live At Fabrik Hamburg series on Jazzline in cooperation with the legendary venue and NDR Kultur – is this previously unreleased concert from jazz greats Freddie Hubbard and McCoy Tyner from 1986.

In the Altonaer Fabrik in 1986, the master trumpeter Freddie Hubbard was a guest in the trio of one of the most important pianists of contemporary jazz: McCoy Tyner, whose extremely powerful attack always added percussive power of the most energetic kind to his virtuoso playing.

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McCoy Tyner Trio – Inception (1962) [Analogue Productions 2011] SACD ISO + FLAC

McCoy Tyner Trio – Inception (1962) [APO Remaster 2011]
SACD Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 32:42 minutes | F/B Covers + PDF booklet | 1,32 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/96 kHz | Covers + PDF booklet | 706 MB

Inception” is McCoy Tyner’s debut album, released on Impulse! in 1962. His trio members on this session are Art Davis on bass and Elvin Jones on drums, all three working outside the confines of John Coltrane’s quartet. Four of the six songs on this recording are Tyner originals; Effendi, the lovely ballad Sunset and the title tune have all been called “standout pieces” by JazzTimes.

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McCoy Tyner Trio – Inception (1962/2011/2013) [Official Digital Download DSF DSD64/2.82MHz + FLAC 24bit/88,2kHz]

McCoy Tyner Trio – Inception (1962/2011/2013)
DSD64 (.dsf) 1 bit/2,82 MHz | Time – 32:55 minutes | 1,29 GB
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/88,2 kHz | Time – 32:55 minutes | 639 MB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: AcousticSounds | Booklet, Front Cover
Genre: Jazz | © Analogue Productions (Impulse)

“Inception” is McCoy Tyner’s debut album, released on Impulse! in 1962. His trio members on this session are Art Davis on bass and Elvin Jones on drums, all three working outside the confines of John Coltrane’s quartet. Four of the six songs on this recording are Tyner originals; Effendi, the lovely ballad Sunset and the title tune have all been called “standout pieces” by JazzTimes.com.

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McCoy Tyner – Nights Of Ballads & Blues (1963) [Analogue Productions Remaster 2011] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

McCoy Tyner – Nights Of Ballads & Blues (1963) [APO Remaster 2011]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 Stereo > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 38:46 minutes | Scans included | 1,61 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 813 MB

As the title implies, this McCoy Tyner release is a low-key, after-hours affair. Far removed from the intensity of work with then-boss John Coltrane, Tyner stretches out on a fine mix of standards and bebop classics. The pianist, of course, always had his own fleet and rich way with ballads, in spite of the galvanizing marathon solos he became known for on live dates and his later experimental recordings with Coltrane. His ballad style is even touched with a bit of sentimentality, which thankfully is kept in check by a bevy of tasteful lines. Backed by the topnotch rhythm tandem of bassist Steve Davis and drummer Lex Humphries, Tyner finds the room to develop classic statements on highlights like Monk’s “‘Round Midnight,” Ellington and Strayhorn’s “Satin Doll,” and Parker’s “Star Eyes.” On more easeful tracks like “For Heaven’s Sake,” Tyner utilizes his block chord approach to meditative and romantic effect. Rounded out by solid blues sides like “Blue Monk” and Tyner’s own “Groove Waltz,” Nights of Ballads and Blues qualifies as one of the pianist’s most enjoyable early discs. (more…)

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McCoy Tyner – The Real McCoy (1967/2012) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

McCoy Tyner – The Real McCoy (1967/2012)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time – 37:21 minutes | 1,52 GB | Genre: Jazz
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Digital Booklet | © Blue Note Records

Originally released as Blue Note BLP 4264 (mono) and BST 84264 (stereo)

The Real McCoy is an engaging and energizing set that finds the extraordinary pianist in peak form. The album highlights his development as both a composer and a performer. For his first album on Blue Note Records, McCoy is joined by Elvin Jones, Ron Carter and Joe Henderson. The quartet performs riveting tunes including “Passion Dance” and “Four by Five.” (more…)

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McCoy Tyner Quartet – New York Reunion (1991) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

McCoy Tyner Quartet – New York Reunion (1991)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 74:38 minutes | 1,66 GB | Genre: Jazz
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Digital Booklet | © Chesky Records

An instantly classic jazz album, and not so incidentally, the best jazz audiophile album ever made. This is one profoundly natural-sounding presentation of an acoustic jazz quartet. New York Reunion is the finest album in years liy both Tyner and Henderson, and it’s Chesky’s most important work to date. (more…)

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McCoy Tyner – McCoy Tyner with Stanley Clarke and Al Foster (2000) [DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz]

McCoy Tyner – McCoy Tyner with Stanley Clarke and Al Foster (2000)
DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz  | Time – 01:05:36 minutes | 2,59 GB | Genre: Jazz
Source: ISO SACD | ©  Telarc
Recorded: (DSD recording) Clinton Recording Studio “B”, New York City, April 27-28, 1999

One of the musical highlights of the new millennium is already here: McCoy Tyner with Stanley Clarke and Al Foster, the follow-up to the legendary pianist’s critically-acclaimed Telarc debut, McCoy Tyner and the Latin All-Stars. On this new release, McCoy Tyner explores the art of the trio, with a dynamic set of 11 tracks that features new tunes from Tyner and Clarke.
McCoy Tyner with Stanley Clarke and Al Foster is a clear indication that Tyner’s interests lie firmly in the future, and in his own compositions. In addition to two takes of “I Want to Tell You ‘Bout That” (the first with Clarke on electric bass, the next on acoustic), other Tyner compositions include “Trane-like,” “Once Upon A Time,” “Goin’ ‘Way Blues,” “Carriba” and “Memories.” Tyner’s unique and blazing interpretations of standards are apparent in his renditions of “Never Let Me Go” and “Will You Still Be Mine.” Another highlight is Clarke’s own “In the Tradition Of.”
McCoy Tyner is assured of a major position in any jazz history of the 20th century—a versatile composer, arranger and leader whose distinctive sound looms over entire generations. He was born in Philadelphia in 1938 when Bud Powell, Benny Golson (and of course, John Coltrane) and many others were in the neighborhood. And Tyner is the only jazz giant to have honed his craft in, of all places, his mother’s beauty parlor in West Philadelphia—jamming among the hair dryers and curling irons.
Stanley Clarke (born in 1951) is also from Philly, and on this project he plays mostly acoustic bass. Well known for his work with Return to Forever and as a trailblazing solo artist, Clarke continues to revolutionize his instrument. A first-generation fusion player who is constantly shifting directions, this project offers a rare opportunity to hear his more straight-ahead playing.
McCoy Tyner with Stanley Clarke and Al Foster is a brilliant second installment of Tyner’s work on Telarc. Both discs make it clear that the undeniable talents of McCoy Tyner continue growing greater with time.

(more…)

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McCoy Tyner – Expansions (1969/2014) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

McCoy Tyner – Expansions (1969/2014)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time – 46:26 minutes | 1,6 GB | Genre: Jazz
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks.com | © Blue Note Records

Of pianist McCoy Tyner’s seven Blue Note albums of the 1967-1970 period, Expansions is the most definitive. Tyner’s group (comprised of trumpeter Woody Shaw, altoist Gary Bartz, tenor saxophonist Wayne Shorter, Ron Carter on cello, bassist Herbie Lewis, and drummer Freddie Waits) is particularly strong, the compositions (four Tyner originals plus Calvin Massey’s “I Thought I’d Let You Know”) are challenging, and the musicians seem quite inspired by each other’s presence. The stimulating music falls between advanced hard bop and the avant-garde, pushing and pulling at the boundaries of modern mainstream jazz. (more…)

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McCoy Tyner – New York Reunion (1991) [Reissue 2007] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

McCoy Tyner – New York Reunion (1991) [Reissue 2007]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DST64 2.0 & 5.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 74:17 minutes | Scans included | 3,24 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 1,4 GB

Pianist McCoy Tyner and tenor-saxophonist Joe Henderson had not recorded together in over two decades when they finally met up for this Chesky Records’ album. With strong assistance from bassist Ron Carter and drummer Al Foster, Tyner and Henderson make for a perfect team on four originals by group members (including the tenor’s classic “Recorda Me”) and four superior standards. The advanced hard bop music is as rewarding as one would expect. (more…)

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McCoy Tyner – Sahara (1972) [MFSL 2006] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

McCoy Tyner – Sahara (1972) [MFSL 2006]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 47:45 minutes | Scans included | 1,92 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Full Scans included | 1,0 GB
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab # UDSACD 2029

After the death of John Coltrane, his longtime pianist McCoy Tyner was in something of a musical quandary. Keeping up with his mentor through the incredible explorations of the early ’60s, he seemed to have some difficulty navigating the even further out territories explored in the two or three years before Coltrane’s death in 1967. His subsequent albums as a leader were solid, enjoyable efforts but seemed oddly retrograde, as though he needed time to settle back and re-digest the information handed down to him. With Sahara, Tyner found the precise perfect “middle ground” on which to stand, more structured than late Coltrane, but exploding with a ferocity and freedom of sound that made it simply one of the greatest jazz recordings of the decade. None of the other members of his quartet ever sounded so inspired, so liberated as they do here. Sonny Fortune threatens to tear the roof off the joint on more than one occasion, Calvin Hill is more than rock-solid on bass, his roots arcing deeply into the earth, and as for Alphonse Mouzon, well, no one familiar with his later vapid meanderings in fusion would begin to recognize him here, so incendiary is his playing. And Tyner develops so much pure energy, channeled with such pinpoint precision, that one worries about the physical stability of any piano under such an assault. From the extraordinarily intense “Ebony Queen” through the ruminative solo “A Prayer for My Family, the equally intense “Rebirth,” and the concluding, side-long title track, there’s not a misstep to be heard. “Sahara,” over the course of its 23 minutes, covers vast ground, echoing the majesty and misery of the geographical area with percussion and flute interludes to some of Tyner’s very best playing on record. Even something that could have resulted in a mere exercise in exotica, his koto performance on “Valley of Life,” exudes both charm and commitment to the form. Tyner would go on to create several fine albums in the mid-’70s, but never again would he scale quite these heights. Sahara is an astonishingly good record and belongs in every jazz fan’s collection.

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McCoy Tyner, Stanley Clarke, Al Foster – McCoy Tyner with Stanley Clarke and Al Foster (2000) {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

McCoy Tyner, Stanley Clarke, Al Foster – McCoy Tyner with Stanley Clarke and Al Foster (2000)
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 Stereo > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 65:14 minutes | Scans included | 2,65 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 1,13 GB

No longer trying to push the envelope of innovation, Tyner settles down with a pair of experts and carves out a very nice, fairly orthodox piano trio album. This is Tyner reaffirming most of his strengths: the massive tone quality, the two-handed control over the entire keyboard, and the generally uplifting attitude conveyed through the shape of his melodic invention. He does so in a program of six originals, three standards, and one tune by Stanley Clarke, mixing modal tunes, blues, funk, ballads, and a mildly Caribbean ringer. Only once does he evoke memories of the classic John Coltrane Quartet – not in “Trane-Like” but in “The Night Has a Thousand Eyes.” Clarke takes a break from the film studios and turns in one of his rare sessions on acoustic double bass, producing solid, faultless, relatively conventional support. He doesn’t leave the electric bass entirely at home, however; his funky side bumps through one of the two versions of “I Want to Tell You ‘Bout That,” and he exercises low-key, electric subtleties on his “In the Tradition Of” and “Caribe.” Foster throws himself skillfully into every situation; he is at ease in all idioms. The sound is excellent, with each instrument, even Tyner’s formidable piano, in perfect balance. (more…)

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McCoy Tyner – Illuminations (2004/2012) [Official Digital Download 24bit/176,4kHz]

McCoy Tyner – Illuminations (2004/2012)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/176,4 kHz | Time – 57:09 minutes | 1,83 GB | Genre: Jazz
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | @ Telarc

Illuminations finds the iconic pianist, McCoy Tyner, leading a star-studded affair that features trumpeter Terence Blanchard, bassist Christian McBride, saxophonist Gary Bartz and drummer Lewis Nash. The eclectic album features compositions written by Tyner, stunning covers and works by fellow bandmates. Included on the album are the blistering Latin-inspired “Angelina,” the joyous “New Orleans Stomp,” and Blachard’s energetic “Blessings”. The album would win the GRAMMY Award for Best Jazz Instrumental Album. (more…)

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McCoy Tyner – Nights Of Ballads & Blues (1963/1997) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

McCoy Tyner – Nights Of Ballads & Blues (1963/1997)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 38:47 minutes | 782 MB | Genre: Jazz
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | @ GRP Records

On this fantastic audiophile recording, Tyner is accompanied by the formidable pair of drummer Lex Humphries and bassist Steve Davis as the trio performs an eclectic mix of standards and bebop classics. Infused with his unique touch and styling, Tyner reinvents classics such as Parker’s “Star Eyes,” and Ellington and Strayhorn’s “Satin Doll.” Also included is a chilling take on the classic “‘Round Midnight.” This intimate listen is essential for any jazz lover’s library. (more…)

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McCoy Tyner Trio – Inception (1962/2013) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

McCoy Tyner Trio – Inception (1962/2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 32:42 minutes | 633 GB | Genre: Jazz
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: ProStudioMasters | @ Impulse! Records

Those familiar with the dense, percussive style that pianist McCoy Tyner has cultivated since the 1970s onwards may be surprised by what they hear on Inception. Like Reaching Fourth and Nights of Ballads and Blues, this album gives listeners the chance to hear what a very young Tyner sounded like outside the confines of the classic John Coltrane quartet of the early ’60s; it reveals a lyrical approach to jazz piano that seems a far cry from Tyner’s mature style. The choice of material is fairly evenly split between modal pieces like “Inception” and more harmonically involved tunes like “Speak Low,” and the pianist’s treatment of both demonstrates the extent to which his early work was rooted in bebop. Tyner had yet to develop the massive orchestral sound and highly distinctive vocabulary of modal licks that would mark his later style, and throughout this album he spins dizzyingly long and singing lines with an exquisitely light touch. The irresistible rush of forward momentum that he maintains on tracks like “Effendi” and “Blues for Gwen” is breathtaking, and there is an exuberant, almost athletic quality to much of his solo work. Bassist Art Davis and drummer Elvin Jones provide superb accompaniment throughout, and they lay a solid rhythmic foundation for Tyner’s sparkling melodic flights. The pianist’s penchant for drama, which asserts itself more strongly in his later work, is on brief display in the original ballad “Sunset”; his skills as an arranger, though evident on several tracks, are perhaps best illustrated by the intricate contrapuntal treatment of “There Is No Greater Love.” –AllMusic Review by Alexander Gelfand

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